Mushroom 101

David Trammel's picture

Mushrooms are a great addition to your diet. You can grow them yourself, or go out into the wild and harvest them. If you do though, its important to understand what you're likely to find, and to be extra careful on getting eatable mushrooms and leaving the ones that are dangerous. Here's a place to start your mushroom information at.

The Beginner’s Guide To All Things Mushroom

Sweet Tatorman's picture

Last week I found 4 1/2 lbs of Oyster mushrooms in prime condition on my morning walk.

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ClareBroommaker's picture

Astonishingly beautiful! I've never seen such, clean fresh, youthful looking oyster mushrooms. I wish I knew mushrooms to collect in the wild. I'm a skeeredy-cat.

Sweet Tatorman's picture

If you chose to learn just a few, these should be on your short list. None even remotely similar would do you really serious harm [on the list for liver transplant]. They are relatively abundant, fruit throughout much of the year, and are quite tasty. I have even found them during warm spells in the Winter.

Sweet Tatorman's picture

I have been foraging fungi for over 50 years but it has been only in the past 10 years or so that I have really spent much more time on it and greatly expanded my knowledge base. There are still mushrooms that I would like to find or find enough of to have a proper serving vs just a taste. In the later category are Black Trumpets [Craterellus fallax] which are in the Chanterelle family [Cantharellaceae] but not the Chanterelle genus [Cantharellus]. I have tasted them twice in very small quantity. On both occasions I was foraging with my #1 mushroom buddy. Technically I have never found them. My #1 mushroom buddy is a younger woman with better eyesight and also I think better visual pattern recognition. Only once she points the first one out can I see the others nearby.
Yesterday we did a mushroom hike and were having a pretty good day. After 3 miles or so her eyes happened to notice some Black Trumpets. Lots of Black Trumpets. Now attuned to their presence she spotted several additional patches in the next few miles. Jackpot! These are a really great tasting mushroom and nothing at all like those species I would call regular Chanterelles which also great tasting mushrooms.
In photo below, the Black Trumpets are the very dark mushrooms. Off to the side those yellow-orange ones are a mix of a couple Chanterelle species, Golden Chanterelle [Cantharellus cibarius] and Smooth chanterelle [Cantharellus lateritius].
BTW, there is a very similar looking species, Craterellus cornucopioides, also called a Black Trumpet by some that is reported to be equally tasty. I have the impression it is mostly found in the Western US.

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Sweet Tatorman's picture

Cooked, these are even darker than as picked.

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