Some US farm & garden seed tariffed due to Chinese origin

ClareBroommaker's picture

Skimming through a 194 page list of imports to the US that will be tariffed beginning September 24, I see that a number of farm and garden seeds are listed. Well, they've been listed since the first round of tariffs. https://ustr.gov/sites/default/files/enforcement/301Investigations/Tarif... All the more reason for those who can, to begin saving your own seed, or even growing enough to share or sell . Even a tiny garden can often produce enough seed to start many new gardens.

I just need to be more disciplined about setting aside bean plants just for seed collection, not for harvest for the table I always wait until the end of the season to let some beans stay on the vine and mature, but by then the plant is under a lot of bug and disease pressure. I end up with damaged seeds with low germination and disease that carries through to the next generation. I really need to let some healthy vine mature seeds from day 1 so that I can put way healthy seeds. Currently, what I do is buy two or three years worth of commercial bean seed at a time.

I do not know if any of my seed is Chinese sourced. Some seed sellers would probably tell me if asked.

mountainmoma's picture

We realy do, seek them out. Also, a small tarriff is a very small part of what you would pay, the seeds are not going away. The whole point of it is that the chineses seeds would be more expensive, and the point of that is that our local sources can then compete and sell more seeds. A tarriff like this will work to encourage local production of seeds, which is the point, and I wish they would make it higher. Maybe next year.

Many people just say, hey, these seeds are .25 less a packet, I am buying them. And do not think of where they came from or the reprocussions

I just set aside seed potatoes, I looked for ones the right size, and put them in a small box labeled seed for one bed. Now, I would realy like more than one bed, so I am considering saving more. Even though they are SO good to eat. I know I want about one potato plant per square foot and my beds are 48 sq ft. Some of my saves are larger pieces I will need to cut, so might count for 2 or 3, most are single potatoes for seed, but I realy wanted to have as much of the Yukon Gem as I could to grow out. My idea is, although I am never ideal in my garden implementation, but the idea is that I could get 2 harvests a year if I grow early potatoes, like they talk about in Growing more vegetables .... their test plots are in Willits CA, and I believe my microclimate is very similar to WIllts, I just get more winter rains

ClareBroommaker's picture

I was not saying that seeds would be unavailable. They'd be more expensive. Stretching my money (I earn $10/hr) is why I've bought two or three years of bean seed at once. I have had in mind previously that I should find a seed grower locally, but never have pursued it. I myself, though, am clearly the grower most local to myself.

Seed is already saved this year for my peppers -both sweet and hot- tomatoes, dill, fennel, lambsquarters, Chinese broccoli, purslane, peaches, plums, and cherries. The latter three get planted in fall, the rest next year, except for cayenne which I only grow every second or third year.

mountainmoma's picture

I like that this supplier will send out in the fall, as most will send out in the spring and it is after I should plant ! http://www.woodprairie.com/category/certified-organic-seed-potatoes

I like seeds from adaptive seeds, as they are a similar microclimate to mines, so I find their selections are good for my location, they grow seeds in the USA, in Oregon. Of course, they do good in most areas of the country. https://www.adaptiveseeds.com/