Dystopia Is Here

David Trammel's picture

Funny, I thought we wouldn't get to the movie sets until at least 2035.

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Justin Patrick Moore's picture

It's been awhile since I've been here. But wow, this image. Thanks for posting this David. I hope you are doing well.

& how many people in that favela does Amazon employ? And at what wage?

What a world we live in. & Even though I haven't been on the forum much this year... the Green Wizard skills are looking like they are going to be needed more than ever as 2021 rounds the corner to the finish line of the year.

Best wishes to everyone in these times.

Very impressive. We have one of those Amazon eye sores in the most rural part of my very urban county and it forces the workforce to drive quite a ways to get to work since there isn't any housing close by or public transport.

Wow. What a jarring contrast.

Does Amazon employ any of the locals?
Will they have massive security problems?
What kind of tax break is Amazon getting?

So many questions.

David Trammel's picture

I would bet that the workers are bussed in from someplace else. I've seen that at a few temporary employment services. You drive to their location, get out of your car and then ride a van to the job. I think its a way to insure you work the entire day, and can't just walk off the job.

In this case, the added benefit for Amazon would be, the scary example the workers would get every time they arrive for work. "There, see where you could end up living if you lose this job", is the clear message.

Unfortunately, tax breaks is another spot where corporations have played local governments like a $5 prostitute. My local city bent over backwards to give some businesses the incentive to locate at a old mall that was renovated recently. Some of the terms came out and people weren't happy, but the elected officials were like "If we don't offer them, then someone else will."

Thank you, David Trammel, for posting @panoparker's picture of the Amazon facility in Mexico. It's a palpable reminder for me of the reason why I canceled my Amazon account a few years' ago. I haven't regretted the decision, nor have I felt I've missed out in any way, probably because I'm almost 64 years' old which means I've lived without online shopping for most of my life already.

I'm wondering if there are others reading this who have also closed their Amazon or other online shopping accounts for principled reasons, or who have consciously decided not to order stuff from Amazon from the outset?

I still try and sell books on Amazon. I started that about 20 years ago when I first heard of it as a way to make money after I lost my last corporate job, but in the last several years, If I sell three books in a year, I am doing good. I have thought about closing it down and trying one of the other online book sellers.

We've got a huge home library. We were selling some of our duplicates and unusual, high-value no-longer-needed or wanted titles. A few years ago, Amazon made it easy for very small sellers like us.
Then they changed the rules WRT payment. We pulled all our titles. We had a dozen or so so it didn't matter to us.

A good friend owns a used bookstore. She lost about 15% or more of her monthly income from online sales when Amazon rejiggered their rules. She had to pull everything (1,000's of titles) in a hurry because of some storage issue; it might have been that she was storing books in an Amazon warehouse so they could be shipped quicker. I can't remember the details.

We do sell OUR NEW books, trade and eBooks, via Amazon. It's virtually the only way an indie author can make a go of it.
Do I trust Amazon not to change the rules? I do not. They're in business for themselves, not for the benefit of small fry like us.

When we buy used titles, we buy from Cupboard Maker Books (if they've got the specific title) or from abebooks.com and alibris. com. Yes, I know that abebooks.com is owned by the Evil Empire. But that business -- FOR RIGHT NOW -- is set up to benefit used bookstore owners.

When I get some time I will see about listing my used books on the other sites you mention. Amazon is a bust for the small seller of used books.

bobmcc's picture

I gave up on Amazon about four years ago when I discovered they were adding their "free" shipping into the price. If I order anything online these days I go to the manufacturer, sometimes with free shipping, or have a local business procure the item/s if they're not in stock at a 10% discount. I rarely order anything online and avoid all corporate big boxes - they don't need my money.

mountainmoma's picture

I just cancelled my membership last month, I had a discounted prime membership I shared with my daughter, and I was using it for watching movies too. I havent watched TV or movies for months now, so no reason to have any streaming service ( I dunno, I have been listing to lots of JMG podcasts and reading dreamwidth blogs and just havent wanted to ). I never order much on there, sometimes if I had no choice and also I get paid in Amazon gift code money every month ( around 10-15 a month) for giving feedback on communications for our local power company, it only takes a few minutes and I have been doing this for years. So, I let it build up to some meaningful amount of money and then purchase something I need. But, I dont need prime for that, so prime is now gone

David Trammel's picture

Speaking of places to sell used books (and other things) maybe we should do a stickie to the Green Wizard Marketplace circle here, listing the websites that offer the best terms and deals for people to get rid of their stuff?

Great idea. I would also welcome online places to sell my clothing items as well.